Depending on your personality, commute time and profession, you may enjoy the opportunity to work from home. Unfortunately, whether you sleep in, stay in your pajamas or take a mid-day nap, not going to the office can have its downsides, both for you and your spouse.

You and your partner likely respond to stressors differently, and no matter how long you have been married, quarantine can shed light on habits previously gone unnoticed. You might feel like hearing his or her pen clicking, pacing or singing along with the radio could send you over the edge.

Three ways couples can survive isolation

While the current pandemic comes with significant stress, there are some ways you can share your living space, and your lives, while you support each other.

Grow closer. If you choose a positive approach to social distancing, you may appreciate the chance to share quality time together. Rather than viewing isolation as a disadvantage, share your dreams for the future, as well as your thoughts and fears about the current crisis.

Develop healthy coping mechanisms. Lack of contact with work friends could make you feel lonely, and you might miss having an opportunity to decompress during your commute once you complete your daily job-related tasks. Whether alone or with your partner, you may need to regulate your mood through new hobbies or activities.

Use your story to help others. Although spending all your time together can raise tension between you and your spouse, find ways to better your situation. You may need to establish boundaries during business hours or find ways to rekindle your romance. Not only will this make quarantine more bearable, but it could also provide ways to advise other married couples in the future.

No matter how much time you wanted to spend together when you started dating, being required to do so now can seem like more of a task than an opportunity. Yet, while this may be the demise of many relationships around you, the survival of your marriage may depend on your response to this situation.